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Speed Queen Washer Shock Absorber Change

Speed Queen Washer Shock Absorber Change

Over time the shock absorbers in the Speed Queen / IPSO soft mount washers will wear out. At this point they become just a set of springs.

You will notice more out of balance concerns and the high extraction speeds are not reached. In some cases you may hear some vibration and even the washer door rattling during the spin cycle.

So it’s time to change the shocks but how do you do it. Personally I didn’t bother with the manual and just figured out a way that worked for me.

        ** This repair requires the use of a number of tools, moving of the washers and other tasks that involve strength and dexterity. There are also some sharp edges on the covers and other areas. If you are not comfortable doing this repair hire a professional. This post is to provide a guide to the method I have used and is no guarantee that you will be able to complete the repair yourself. . The manufacturer and/or service techs may suggest and use another method. Disconnect all power and utilities before working on the machine**

Speed Queen Washer

 

I also only change the lower part of the shock as the upper part is only a smooth rod.

New lower shock parts

The first thing you need to do is get the washer to a point that you can access all of the sides easily. Mine are mounted on sturdy bases but many of them are bolted together so I have to move the washers. You will also need to access the mounting bolt on the bottom of the machine so unless there is a place to reach into the base the washer will need to move at least partially off the base.

I have some metal channel that I use that is high enough for the leveling bolts to clear the frame. Use a prybar to tilt the washer and slide the channel underneath. Once the channel is under the washer it is easy to tip the washer back to level and push the channel under the back of the machine.

When the washer is in the position shown below the front shocks can be changed. This is a good starting point as the washer will remain stable between the other washers.

Use metal channel to slide washer off base

The shocks are located in each of the 4 corners. The shiny vertical tube in the picture below is the lower part of the shock absorber.
The support does not normally need to be removed to replace the shock.

Speed Queen Washer Shock

Remove the nut from the bottom of the shock. This is found on the bottom of the washer. There is also a rubber mount and washer.

 

Below is the method I use that probably isn’t recommended by the manufacturer. I use a 2″ x 4″ about 4′ long to push the washer drom away from the shock I am working on.

**This is a tricky part as it takes a good amount of strength to push the drum up, push up on the lower part of the shock to compress the internal springs, and pull the stud on the bottom of the shock out of the hole and towards the front to remove it from the  washer.

You also need to be careful of the motor, wiring and control boards.

Use 2×4 to lift drum

Once the lower shock is removed you will notice the plastic end will be worn and / or broken and there is oil on the part.

Worn shock on Speed Queen Washer

 

Positioning Cart Under Speed Queen Washer

With the cart in place hold it securely , or use some assistance, and slide the washer forward on to the cart.

Use caution to keep the balance as the washers are heavy. Removing the lower front cover helps to provide a place to grab if needed and prevents damage to the cover. You will also need access behind this cover to remove the front shocks.

Moving a Speed Queen Washer from the base

When the washer is moved out it allows access to the connections on the back. In some cases these can be removed before moving the washer. Use caution not to cut or stretch the hoses or wiring.

This allows access to the back of the Speed Queen washer

I have used this method to relocate washers inside the store as well. Some machines may see a lot more use than others so you may want to rotate them around the store.

A Speed Queen washer on a cart and off the base.

This shows the top of the shock absorber mount. Although we will not be changing the top the parts are the same on the bottom.

Next we need to access the rear shocks. This is done by removing as many screws as we can to get easy access but leaving enough in place to hold the washer together.

Lift top and remove screws from interior panel at rear.
Once screws are removed separate side and back panel
Screws on lower side panels

Rear Panel moved for access. CAUTION- Edges of rear panel are very sharp.

The motor and drive belt can be seen once the covers are opened up. Use caution around the motor and wires when lifting the drum to remove the shock.

Motor and belt in a Speed Queen washer

Follow the same method to replace the rear shocks. Be aware that the washer may be unstable if using a cart. Extra help may be required to hold the washer steady during the repair.

Put all of the parts pack together, replace all of the screw, connect the utilities, position the washer and give it a test run.

As I mentioned at the beginning of this post. This is not a repair that everyone can do. If you are unsure or unable to complete these tasks then I hope I provided enough information for you to observe a qualified service tech and watch for the concern points.

Ken Barrett

Episode 28 – The Coin Box Problem

The Coin Box Problem

 

Previously I posted about this topic and my plans. See The Post Here

      The large capacity washers I have I my Laundromat are $6 per cycle. They are the largest machines in the City I am located in o they get a lot of use. The store only has two of this size machine so keeping them running is critical.

      Due to the demand and some original design issues the coin boxes are filling up between collections. In some cases the coins have backed up into the coin drop mechanism and prevented more coins from being inserted.

  How do you think a customer feels that has loaded their clothes and detergents into a washer, inserted $5 in quarters and can’t get any more to go in?

There are a few options to solve this issue:
1- CREDIT / DEBIT card acceptance at the washer or through a Loyalty card or Kiosk payment. While there are a number of benefits to this there are some other considerations.
Cost: Initial installation costs for any of these methods is high for a small store and usually 10 machines is the minimum required for a system to be installed.
Customer Acceptance: In my market very few of my Self Serve customers use credit or debit cards and have no interest in loading money onto a Loyalty / Laundry Card.
Customer Usage: The time required to convert customers to use a card, if they switch at all, may not eliminate the issue on busy weekends.

2- DOLLAR COINS OR TOKENS: I have made some changes in another of my Laundromats to a Dollar Coin on one machine, my attendants use them when needed on that machine and provide change to customers whenever possible. I will also be switching other machines soon.
In the Laundromat I am having problems in there is no attendant. I have 1 dual hopper changer that has quarters on both sides. Switching one side to $1 coins may cause more weekend trips due to a jammed machine. Adding an additional single changer is an option but not at this time.

 3- MORE COIN CAPACITY: Due to the construction of the machine there are restrictions. I originally looked at removing the internal part of the coin box and having a chute that the coins would drop through into a safe in the base, similar to a vacuum at a car wash, the coins actually end up in a safe near the ground in the concrete base. It would be more of a hassle to empty the machine but the capacity could be a couple of weeks.
This method would not work due to the location of the drain valve and piping.

Installing a larger coin box was possible but only if the box length was changed. The manufacturer did not make a longer coin box so I modified what I had to do the job.

      The first step is to make a bigger box.

      Next is to make the changes to the machine so the box will fit and work correctly.

      As you will see in the videos there are a few issues that need to be addressed and it took some time to get all the parts together and make the changes. The first machine took about an hour to get the work completed. The second one took about 15 minutes.

The videos show some of the steps and items to watch for.

      Hint: Knock the rivets off from the inside of the coin box cover before you do anything else. There are a few that are exposed inside the machine and can be drilled out but a few need to be removed from the inside and is easiest with the box still supported by the back cover.

      Each machine type will have some differences and may require some changes to this method but my overall cost to do make the changes was about $50 and the time was less than one trip to empty the box mid-week.

And Yes it does look like a stretch limo when you pull it out.

Please add any questions or comments below.

 

Ken

Leak Behind Dexter Washer

Leak Behind Dexter Washer

     We have been noticing water on the floor behind a couple of Dexter washers lately. This morning I headed in to see what the problem was.

      Last week we had a similar issue and the drain did not seem to be as quick as it should be and it seemed like the suds were backing up and rolling out of the vent tubes the top loaders connect to. I called in the plumber to jet the lines and after a couple of attempts to get it through the P-Trap (ours are below the floor and he has to be on top of the bulkhead to access it), he finally left to get the end of the water jet tube repaired. It had been bent too many times and just kinked when he tried to push it through the P-Trap.

 

     It was finally cleared out. He did give me a warranty as he was not confident it was as clean as it could be. Usually they won’t give a warranty due to the trash (coins, bra wires, strings, etc) that goes down the pipes.

 

      So back to today and we still had a problem. I checked the horizontal pipe as it was not part of the jetting and it was in really good shape. While I was drying the floor and looking around my attendant ran a load in the machine and during the spin cycle some suds came out of the top vent at the back. This vent is there to prevent an air lock that may prevent the washer from draining.

 

      Next step was to check the drain valve to make sure it was not plugged and I found some suds still in there after the cycle was complete.

      As I was working on this issue I was also looking for leaks in another bulkhead. This second bulkhead has some old valves that have some small drips that need to be replaced. I am waiting for a schedule for the parking lot to be paved and I will shut down and replace the valves at that time.

      During this time my attendant started the Dexter washer connected to it. It had a load of table cloths so I kept an eye on it to see if I would get the same issue. 

         Sure enough when it went in the spin cycle some suds puffed out the back. 

      Root Cause: The attendant was using too much soap. a problem that we have all experienced with the customers.

  

          I’m continuing to dry the floor in the bulkhead and I’ll review the Operation Standards with the attendants.

                 Tired of talking to your attendants over and over again about what is expected?  Set up Operation Standards for each process and train everyone the same. The ones I use in my store are available here.

Operation Standards

 Questions or Comments? Please leave them below and I will get back to you right away.

Ken

 

Episode 26 – Bulkheads

Coin Laundry Bulkheads- Definition and Explanation

     This is a term that many who have been in the Coin Laundry business for years talk about all of the time and we may forget that people that are new to the business are not familiar with all of the terminology.

Bulkheads

          Lets start with a definition and go from there.

According To WikiPedia

Bulkhead may refer to:

A structural safety device:

  • Bulkhead (partition), a wall within the hull of a ship, vehicle, or container
  • Torpedo bulkhead, a type of armor designed to keep a ship afloat even if the hull is struck by a shell or by a torpedo
  • Bulkhead (barrier), a retaining wall used as a form of coastal management, akin to a seawall, or as a structural device such as a bulkhead partition
  • Bulkhead door, an angled door covering the exterior stairwell of a basement
  • Bulkhead flatcar, a type of rolling stock designed with sturdy end-walls to prevent loads from shifting past the ends of the car
  • Rear pressure bulkhead, an airtight structural feature of an aircraft

 Well that certainly cleared it up.

           As with many words they have evolved from the original meaning and morphed into something else.

            We can pull out part of the term that it means a wall. Previously I worked in the paint facility of a automotive manufacturing plant. A bulkhead there referred to a part of a wall or a steel plate where the paint lines connected from one side to the other. Usually through a rows of fittings.

         We are getting closer now.

           In Laundromats the Bulkheads are the area behind the washers where the utilities are routed and connected. 

         The sizes vary depending on the size and type of the machines.

 

An older Laundromat Bulkhead with open trench drains.

     Older Laundromat normally had rows of Top Load washing machines. They backed up against a bulkhead that was run through the store. These tended to be short and narrow. Typically about the height of the back of the Top Load washer and about 12′ to 16′ across.

         As machines got bigger these were sometimes modified to be taller the cover the back of the newer washers.

 The contents of the bulkhead has not changed.

           Power: This can be from 120 V to 240 V in most laundromats and could be single or 3 Phase. The connections are made directly in the back of the machine or through a standard plug and receptacle.

 

Bulkhead with breaker panel.

Electrical panels containing the breakers for the washers are normally mounted on the ends of the bulkhead to provide easy access for Service Techs and customers should a problem come up. The older Top Loader bulkheads had the electrical panels mounted under the top cover.

This picture shows the original end of the bulkhead with the location of the breaker panel. The Bulkhead was increased in height to accommodate the larger washers

Although the height of the bulkhead was increased the depth was not as there were no other washers on this side of the bulkhead. If washers were added the bulkhead would need to be increased to at least 30″ deep. 

 A view of the original bulkhead and breaker panel with the framing for the larger washers.

Water: Hot and cold. Piping sizes have increased from 1/2″ up to 2″ depending on the size and amount of washers connected to each bulkhead. Each washer will have a minimum of 1 Hot and 1 Cold connection. Some have additional connections for feeding the chemicals (soap) trays so the flow can be adjusted to prevent the soap tray from overflowing or spraying out the top. These can be connected with a Y connection after the valve or with a separate connection to the piping.
The main water pipes are sometimes referred to as Header pipes (Headers). Each connection will have a valve at the header.

          The timers on most washing machines do not actually run until the washer fills with water to the preset level. Having the right sized piping and water flow will fill the washers fast and complete the wash in the shortest time possible.

         Water flow is affected by each part of the system. Piping and hoses should be as large as possible (within reason of course). But don’t overlook the valves at the headers. Install a ball valve or similar type will provide a full flow of water as opposed to a Globe valve that has restriction built in.

 

 The following diagrams help show this difference.

Another possible restriction is the hose size between the valve and the washer. Many installations now are completed with custom hoses made of 3/4″ ID (Interior Dimension) material. The ones for your home washer are not meant for a large capacity washer. 

Custom made hoses in Laundromat Bulkhead. Correct length and size provide unrestricted flow.

Drains: The water has to go somewhere and it’s all downhill from here. Top Load and small, soft mount front load washers have built in pumps to push the water up and into a drain pipe. This type of setup is also used to prevent the water from running out of the washer.  Larger washers have a gravity drain that is controlled by a drain valve below the drum that is opened and closed between cycles.

Drain Valve in Action

            A washer with a drain valve is connected directly to the drain pipe and will probably be combined with the other washers to the building drain. The drain piping size and slope is also important to handle the volume that will fill the pipe when the drain valve opens. 

          Many customers that are using multiple machines will start them all within seconds of each other so they all finish at the same time.

          The drains can be connected together in a single pipe or connected to a steel drain trough. This trough works well as a place for coins and other items to settle and prevent the piping from being plugged . In some cases the drain is an open trough under the bulkheads. This is only found in older stores as it leads to a humid and smelly laundromat.

 

This problem was covered here and Here

          That is the basics of Laundromat Bulkheads. The size, shape and material varies but they all have the same purpose.

          When you are designing your laundromat or making upgrades make sure the bulkheads are big enough and deep enough to handle all of the utilities and the Service Tech that needs to get in there to work on the equipment. Most washer motors can only be removed from the back.

 

If you have any questions or comments please let me know.

 

Ken

Coin Laundry Bulkheads- Definition and Explanation

Coin Laundry Bulkheads- Definition and Explanation

     This is a term that many who have been in the Coin Laundry business for years talk about all of the time and we may forget that people that are new to the business are not familiar with all of the terminology.

Bulkheads

          Lets start with a definition and go from there.

According To WikiPedia

Bulkhead may refer to:

A structural safety device:

  • Bulkhead (partition), a wall within the hull of a ship, vehicle, or container
  • Torpedo bulkhead, a type of armor designed to keep a ship afloat even if the hull is struck by a shell or by a torpedo
  • Bulkhead (barrier), a retaining wall used as a form of coastal management, akin to a seawall, or as a structural device such as a bulkhead partition
  • Bulkhead door, an angled door covering the exterior stairwell of a basement
  • Bulkhead flatcar, a type of rolling stock designed with sturdy end-walls to prevent loads from shifting past the ends of the car
  • Rear pressure bulkhead, an airtight structural feature of an aircraft

 Well that certainly cleared it up.

           As with many words they have evolved from the original meaning and morphed into something else.

            We can pull out part of the term that it means a wall. Previously I worked in the paint facility of a automotive manufacturing plant. A bulkhead there referred to a part of a wall or a steel plate where the paint lines connected from one side to the other. Usually through a rows of fittings.

         We are getting closer now.

           In Laundromats the Bulkheads are the area behind the washers where the utilities are routed and connected. 

         The sizes vary depending on the size and type of the machines.

An older Laundromat Bulkhead with open trench drains.

          Older Laundromat normally had rows of Top Load washing machines. They backed up against a bulkhead that was run through the store. These tended to be short and narrow. Typically about the height of the back of the Top Load washer and about 12′ to 16′ across.

         As machines got bigger these were sometimes modified to be taller the cover the back of the newer washers.

 The contents of the bulkhead has not changed.

           Power: This can be from 120 V to 240 V in most laundromats and could be single or 3 Phase. The connections are made directly in the back of the machine or through a standard plug and receptacle.

Bulkhead with breaker panel.

               Electrical panels containing the breakers for the washers are normally mounted on the ends of the bulkhead to provide easy access for Service Techs and customers should a problem come up. The older Top Loader bulkheads had the electrical panels mounted under the top cover.

 

This picture shows the original end of the bulkhead with the location of the breaker panel. The Bulkhead was increased in height to accommodate the larger washers

              Although the height of the bulkhead was increased the depth was not as there were no other washers on this side of the bulkhead. If washers were added the bulkhead would need to be increased to at least 30″ deep. 

A view of the original bulkhead and breaker panel with the framing for the larger washers.

           Water: Hot and cold. Piping sizes have increased from 1/2″ up to 2″ depending on the size and amount of washers connected to each bulkhead. Each washer will have a minimum of 1 Hot and 1 Cold connection. Some have additional connections for feeding the chemicals (soap) trays so the flow can be adjusted to prevent the soap tray from overflowing or spraying out the top. These can be connected with a Y connection after the valve or with a separate connection to the piping.
The main water pipes are sometimes referred to as Header pipes (Headers). Each connection will have a valve at the header.

          The timers on most washing machines do not actually run until the washer fills with water to the preset level. Having the right sized piping and water flow will fill the washers fast and complete the wash in the shortest time possible.

         Water flow is affected by each part of the system. Piping and hoses should be as large as possible (within reason of course). But don’t overlook the valves at the headers. Install a ball valve or similar type will provide a full flow of water as opposed to a Globe valve that has restriction built in.

    The following diagrams help show this difference.

       

     

           Another possible restriction is the hose size between the valve and the washer. Many installations now are completed with custom hoses made of 3/4″ ID (Interior Dimension) material. The ones for your home washer are not meant for a large capacity washer. 

Custom made hoses in Laundromat Bulkhead. Correct length and size provide unrestricted flow.

          Drains: The water has to go somewhere and it’s all downhill from here. Top Load and small, soft mount front load washers have built in pumps to push the water up and into a drain pipe. This type of setup is also used to prevent the water from running out of the washer.  Larger washers have a gravity drain that is controlled by a drain valve below the drum that is opened and closed between cycles.

Drain Valve in Action

            A washer with a drain valve is connected directly to the drain pipe and will probably be combined with the other washers to the building drain. The drain piping size and slope is also important to handle the volume that will fill the pipe when the drain valve opens. 

          Many customers that are using multiple machines will start them all within seconds of each other so they all finish at the same time.

          The drains can be connected together in a single pipe or connected to a steel drain trough. This trough works well as a place for coins and other items to settle and prevent the piping from being plugged . In some cases the drain is an open trough under the bulkheads. This is only found in older stores as it leads to a humid and smelly laundromat.

Coin Laundry Drain Piping

This problem was covered here and Here

          That is the basics of Laundromat Bulkheads. The size, shape and material varies but they all have the same purpose.

          When you are designing your laundromat or making upgrades make sure the bulkheads are big enough and deep enough to handle all of the utilities and the Service Tech that needs to get in there to work on the equipment. Most washer motors can only be removed from the back.

     

If you have any questions or comments please let me know.

Ken

Speed Queen Horizon Door Lock Repair

Speed Queen Horizon Door Lock Repair

This was a bit of a strange one as it was more of an alignment issue than a broken part.

The video covers a lot of explanation about how the door lock operates so it will help you troubleshoot other issues as well. 

 

This is the door lock mechanism located inside the front panel of the IPSO / Speed Queen / Horizon Model washers

 The part on the door that is used to move the metal part shown above and locks the door during the cycle.

 

 In the middle of this picture is the small, plastic lock in that holds the metal plate in place during operation.

 

Washing machine water leak. Speed Queen / Huebsch Top Loaders

Washing machine water leak. Speed Queen Top Loaders

          There was a small amount of water under one of the Top Load washers. I had been working on a machine beside it and after I was done I found a small drip from the hose connection. I tightened it up but a few days later it was still slowly leaking from under the washer. Sometimes it takes a bit for the water to dry under a machine so seeing some wet spots the next day is not always an issue. 

           When I pulled the front off of the washer (two small screws at the bottom) I noticed water in the bottom part of the frame. The hoses seemed OK so I pulled the pump of by un-snapping the 3 clips and found water on top of the pump.

         As you can see in the video, once I cleaned up the pump and filled it with water it leaked around the seal at the point where the motor connects to the pump.

       I installed a new pump and everything worked fine.

 

Ken

Speed Queen Washer Not Rinsing

Speed Queen Washer Not Rinsing And / Or Stuck at __ minutes.

I was recently out of town and got a call that one of my Speed Queen washers was having problems.


I’m continually working with my attendants to provide as many details as they can about any problems as it is all used to determine the root cause of the issue. Many times it is difficult for them if the store is busy so sometimes you have to piece together a couple of comments.

In this case one of my attendants had a problem and put some Caution Tape on the washer. Unfortunately the details were not written in the log book. The next attendant came in the following day, saw the tape and tried a cycle.

Another cycle was tried later in the day after they had cycled the power.

Through the course of a couple of phone calls and some discussion when I got back I got a better picture of the problem.

Comments: “It stopped at 12 minutes and stayed there”, It stopped at 19 minutes and stayed there”, “The clothes were soaked when we pulled them out”.

Once I was able to look at it I found that the washer filled the wash cycle fine on a Hot cycle but not on a cold cycle. The next item I found was that the detergent flush was working OK but the rinse cycle was not filling up.

 

Listening to the water line I could tell there was some cold water flow through the fill valve but not much.

I switched the wires between the flush and fill valve to determine if it was a wire or connector problem but nothing changed.

Once the cold water valve was changed everything worked fine.

The repair is not that difficult.

Power off the machine, Take a picture of the wire connections, unbolt the valve, switch the wires one at a time to the new valve, switch the hoses one at a time to the new valve and bolt it back in.

Total time is about 30 minutes to change the valve.

If you have any comments please post them below.

Ken

The Problem: The Coin Box On The Washer Was Filling Up.

The Problem: The Coin Box On The Washer Was Filling Up.

Previously I posted about this topic and my plans. See The Post Here

     The large capacity washers I have I my Laundromat are $6 per cycle. They are the largest machines in the City I am located in o they get a lot of use. The store only has two of this size machine so keeping them running is critical.

     Do to the demand and some original design issues the coin boxes are filling up between collections. In some cases the coins have backed up into the coin drop mechanism and prevented more coins from being inserted.

    How do you think a customer feels that has loaded their clothes and detergents into a washer, inserted $5 in quarters and can’t get any more to go in?

     There are a few options to solve this issue:
1- CREDIT / DEBIT card acceptance at the washer or through a Loyalty card or Kiosk payment. While there are a number of benefits to this there are some other considerations.
Cost: Initial installation costs for any of these methods is high for a small store and usually 10 machines is the minimum required for a system to be installed.
Customer Acceptance: In my market very few of my Self Serve customers use credit or debit cards and have no interest in loading money onto a Loyalty / Laundry Card.
Customer Usage: The time required to convert customers to use a card, if they switch at all, may not eliminate the issue on busy weekends.

               2- DOLLAR COINS OR TOKENS: I have made some changes in another of my Laundromats to a Dollar Coin on one machine, my attendants use them when needed on that machine and provide change to customers whenever possible. I will also be switching other machines soon.
In the Laundromat I am having problems in there is no attendant. I have 1 dual hopper changer that has quarters on both sides. Switching one side to $1 coins may cause more weekend trips due to a jammed machine. Adding an additional single changer is an option but not at this time.

           3- MORE COIN CAPACITY: Due to the construction of the machine there are restrictions. I originally looked at removing the internal part of the coin box and having a chute that the coins would drop through into a safe in the base, similar to a vacuum at a car wash, the coins actually end up in a safe near the ground in the concrete base. It would be more of a hassle to empty the machine but the capacity could be a couple of weeks.
This method would not work due to the location of the drain valve and piping.

     Installing a larger coin box was possible but only if the box length was changed. The manufacturer did not make a longer coin box so I modified what I had to do the job.

The first step is to make a bigger box.

 

      Next is to make the changes to the machine so the box will fit and work correctly.

      As you will see in the videos there are a few issues that need to be addressed and it took some time to get all the parts together and make the changes. The first machine took about an hour to get the work completed. The second one took about 15 minutes.

      The videos show some of the steps and items to watch for.

 

       Hint: Knock the rivets off from the inside of the coin box cover before you do anything else. There are a few that are exposed inside the machine and can be drilled out but a few need to be removed from the inside and is easiest with the box still supported by the back cover.

Each machine type will have some differences and may require some changes to this method but my overall cost to do make the changes was about $50 and the time was less than one trip to empty the box mid-week.

And Yes it does look like a stretch limo when you pull it out.

Please add any questions or comments below.

 

Ken Barrett
800-792-1941 ext 2
Ken@WashinCoinLaundry.com

 

P.S. If you would like information on Blog system and how to use it in your business CLICK HERE

Coin Box Expansion- How To Increase The Capacity Of Your Washer Coin Boxes

Coin Box Expansion- How To Increase The Capacity Of Your Washer Coin Boxes

 

       I am having a “problem” with some of my large capacity washers. The coin boxes are filling up too fast.

      There is nothing more frustrating to a customer than to have $5 in quarters go into a washer and then they can’t get the last dollar in.

         There are a number of changes I could make from adding credit / debit cards at the machines to converting to dollar coins.

         I will go into the details of those later but the quickest method is to expand the coin box. It might not be pretty but it will work.

 If you have any comments please post them below.

 

Ken Barrett
800-792-1941 ext 2

 
 

P.S Live your dreams now? Check it out Here